Dreich

dreich |dɹiːx| adjective • Scottish English (of the weather) dull and depressing; dreary, bleak; cold, unpleasant, and often wet. I will admit upfront that I'm not one for small talk. I'm not good at it and I don't particularly enjoy it. You could argue that one is a consequence of the other, but I just …

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Feuillemorte

feuillemorte |ˈfɜːjəmɔrt|adjective • English, French of or having the color of dead or dying leaves. We're well and truly in the heart of fall now, and that means seasonal words abound! Autumn and winter always seem to be the seasons described with the most poignant and evocative words — their proximity to the end of …

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Trochilidine

trochilidine |ˌtroʊˈkɪlədɑɪn|adjective • English of, like, or pertaining to hummingbirds. Birds are fascinating. They're marvels of the animal kingdom, capable of physical and mental acrobatics that are making us reconsider what is possible. Recent studies have illuminated them as astoundingly intelligent, and they even have language, a trait that was once thought unique to humans. …

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Antejentacular

antejentacular |ˌæntəʤenˈtækjulər| adjective • English occurring before breakfast. When I came across this word I immediately thought of the White Queen's famous quote in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass: "Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast." I'm sure many of us aspire to that level of productivity. Getting anything meaningful …

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Decemnovenarian

decemnovenarian |dɪːˌsemnoʊvənˈerɪːən| noun • English a person of the 19th century. Confession time: I'm a bit of a sucker for 19th-century stuff. I'm especially fond of Victorian and Victorian Gothic things in particular. It was an interesting period of time, steeped in its own brand of melodrama characterized by elegant fashion, not-so-elegant living conditions, and …

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